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2 ways parents violate custody and visitation orders

On Behalf of | Sep 19, 2022 | Child Custody

When parents who share a child enter into a custody order with the court, the terms set forth in that order are binding and should be observed by both parties. Unfortunately, it is not uncommon for one or both parents to violate the custody order in a way that compels the other parent to seek redress with the court.

The court takes any action that violates the court order very seriously. Here are some of the ways parents violate custody orders:

Parental alienation

This is, perhaps, the most damaging type of custody order violation to the child and the alienated parent. During the custody and visitation ruling, it is likely the judge will include a non-disparagement clause that requires both parents to abstain from actions that undermine the other parent in front of the child. Parental alienation can take a number of forms such as disparaging remarks and inciting the child to disrespect the other parent. If your spouse is attempting to alienate you from your child, it is important that you take appropriate steps to address this behavior and protect your child.

Interference with visitation

It is not uncommon for either parent to interfere with visitation either through refusal or failure to return the child in time. Sometimes, the custodial parent may deny the non-custodial parent their visitation rights on grounds that they are behind on child support payments. Or, the parent with visitation rights may refuse to return the child for whatever reason. Either action amounts to a violation of the custody order.

Violating a custody order is a serious matter with serious consequences. Find out how you can safeguard your parental rights and child’s best interest if your ex is violating a custody order.

 

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